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  • How to Detect Signs of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    How To Detect Diabetes

    Type 1 Diabetes

    Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and roughly 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy.  Learning to detect the symptoms of type 1 diabetes, combined with insulin therapy and other treatments can decrease the risk of developing serious complications of diabetes, including heart and blood vessel disease, nerve damage, kidney damage, eye damage, foot damage, skin and mouth conditions and more. Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can come on quickly and may include:

    • Increased thirst. Common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include frequent urination, and often feeling very thirsty. Excess sugar that builds up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues, causing you to drink and urinate more than usual.
    • Bedwetting for children who previously didn’t wet their bed at nigh
    • Extreme hunger. Lacking enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your organs and muscles are depleted of energy making you feel very hungry, even though you are eating. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/basics/sympto…
    • Unintended weight loss. Even though you may be eating more due to increased hunger, you may lose weight. Lacking the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses fuels stored in fat and muscle.
    • Irritability and mood changes.
    • Abdominal pain, as well as nausea and vomiting.
    • Blurred vision.
    • Serious diaper rash that does not respond to treatment
    • Fruity breath and rapid breath.
    • Frequent yeast infections in girls.
    • Early warning signs include extreme fatigue, even if no strenuous activities have been performed as your cells are deprived of sugar.

     

    Type 2 Diabetes

    Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset and noninsulin dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition caused by high levels of glucose in the blood. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly and are sometimes so mild they can be difficult to detect.

    Learning how to detect signs of Type 2 diabetes and by taking doctor prescribed preventative measures can help decrease the risk of developing serious complications of diabetes, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations.

    • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your organs and muscles are depleted of energy, which can make you feel very hungry despite eating.
    • Increased thirst. Excess sugar that builds up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues, causing you to drink and urinate more than usual.
    • Weight loss. Though you may be eating more due to increased hunger, you may lose weight. Lacking the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses fuels stored in fat and muscle.
    • Early warning signs include extreme fatigue, even if no strenuous activities have been performed as your cells are deprived of sugar.
    • Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal, as Type 2 diabetes affects your ability to heal and resist infection. The person might also experience dry, itchy skin.
    •  Signs might also include the feeling of pins and needles, tingling, pain or numbness in your feet and/or hands, and in some cases, losing feeling entirely.
    • Areas of darkened skin. Individuals with type 2 diabetes sometimes get patches of dark, velvety skin in the creases and folds of their body, including the neck and armpits. Known as acanthosis nigricans, this condition could be sign of insulin resistance.
    • Talk to your doctor about the various tests that measure your average blood glucose levels and can help detect diabetes, including the A1C, Fasting Plasma Glucose, the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, and the Random Plasma Glucose Test.

     

    Sources:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20019573

    http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/exercise-and-type-1-diabetes.html

    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P01977

    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P01977

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/symptoms/

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diagnosis/?loc=symptoms

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/symptoms/

    http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/recognizing-symptoms#CommonSymptoms2

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

  • Medical ID Bracelets for Epilepsy

    Over two million people in the United States have epilepsy, and for those individuals, carrying a medical ID bracelet with them at all times is critically important to help them get the medical assistance they need quickly and efficiently in the event of an unexpected seizure. Custom engraved medical alert bracelets from N-Style ID can communicate vital medical information when an epilepsy patient may not be able to speak for himself or herself. We also understand that wearing a boring, traditional medical bracelet can get old, which is why offer a wide range of stylish and fun ID bracelets.

    Pandora Bracelet Pandora Style Bracelet

    Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which abnormal brain activity causes recurrent, unprovoked seizures during which the person experiences abnormal behavior, symptoms and sensations. Symptoms of epilepsy may include temporary confusion, staring spells, uncontrollable jerking movements, and loss of consciousness or awareness. While symptoms vary from patient to patient, it is quite common that a person with epilepsy may be unable to communicate what is happening to those around them or to explain the medical attention they need in a timely manner. Continue reading

  • Fun Family Activities for the Fall

    Fun Family Activities for the Fall

    Hard to believe that summer has come and gone so quickly, but the good news is there’s plenty of fun to be had for the fall. As the kids head back to school, the air gets crisper and the days a bit shorter, it’s always great to plan fun family activities for the evenings and weekends. Let’s explore some entertaining activities and let us know what you plan on doing in the comment section below.

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  • Diabetes Prevention Tips

    Over 18 million people in the United States have diabetes, including early onset type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, which is the most common form of the disease and usually occurs later in life. While those numbers continue to grow year after year, it’s important to learn critical steps that can be taken to prevent type 2 diabetes, especially among those who are at high-risk for development. (There is currently no prevention for type 1 diabetes). By taking these preventative steps you can help to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes, and also lower your risk for possible complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems.

    Diabetes Prevention Tips Diabetes Prevention Tips

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  • What are Triggers for Seizures?

    Even though epilepsy is the 4th most common neurological disorder, affecting an estimated 1 in 26 people at some point in their lifetime, there’s still a great deal about seizures that many people don’t know. One of the first questions many people have is: what are triggers for seizures? While for more than half the people with epilepsy have no identifiable causes of the condition, for the other half the condition can be traced to a variety of factors.

    What are triggers for seizures? What are triggers for seizures?

    Identifying and understanding the triggers, symptoms, risk factors and preventative measures for seizures are vitally important for helping to minimize their occurrence and potential complications. Some people find that seizures are more likely to occur in certain situations and keeping track of those factors that may precipitate a seizure can help you recognize when a seizure might be coming and what triggers you should try to avoid. Common triggers for seizures can include: Continue reading

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