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  • Living with Diabetes: Tips for a Safe and Joyful Winter Season

    The winter season brings with it many joys: holiday parties, family reunions, presents, and cold weather activities like sledding and snowman building. For people living with diabetes, however, the winter also presents challenges: changes in blood sugar and circulation due to the cold, changes in activity level and diet, and also more stress.
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  • A Wonderful Holiday Party Season for Children with Food Allergies

    The holiday season is a joyful time of year, especially for children eagerly anticipating special treats like sweets and toys. For parents of children with food allergies, however, it can also be an anxious time. Those same treats that kids look forward to can be life-threatening dangers to children with food allergies. The threat may seem obscure to some who don’t have kids with food allergies. In fact, according to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN), food allergies affect 6 million children in the U.S., a full 8 percent of the population. This means that food allergies should be on everyone’s mind when preparing food for holiday gatherings. With proper preparation and raised awareness, the holidays can be less worrisome for parents and safer for children.
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  • Living with Epilepsy: The Myths

    The condition of epilepsy has been documented since the earliest medical texts. Stigma against the condition likely reaches back even further in history. Over the centuries, epilepsy has been associated with religious experiences, demonic possession, witchcraft, and mental illness, among other things.

    Even during times when epilepsy was considered a curse from the gods, however, there were individuals fighting against misconceptions about the disorder and the seizures that accompany it. Among these was the Greek physician Hippocrates, who argued against divine explanation in the book On the Sacred Disease, written around 400 B.C. Although there have been many advances in medical understanding of epilepsy, misconceptions about the condition continue to this day.
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  • When a Loved One Has Dementia: Some Coping Techniques

    In a previous blog, titled “What is Dementia?”, the condition of dementia was explored in terms of symptoms, causes, and treatments. Broadly, dementia describes a cluster of symptoms that interfere with every day life. The symptoms can included memory loss, inability to learn new things, problems with organization, change in personality, agitation, delusions, and even hallucinations. With improvements in medicine leading to longer lifetimes, more people than ever have loved ones who live with dementia.
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  • Making Halloween a Treat—Not a Trick—for Your Diabetic Child

    For children with diabetes, Halloween is often a difficult time. Diabetic children must refuse much of the abundant candy being offered to them persistently during the Halloween season. As a result, the holiday can lead to feelings of deprivation for these children. Although Halloween planning for parents with diabetic children can seem daunting, there are many ways to make the holiday a great treat for everyone.

    A wonderful Halloween for you and your diabetic child begins with forming a game plan. Medical ID bracelets are essential to a happy, safe Halloween. If your child doesn’t have medical alert jewelry already, now is the time to get it.
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