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Diabetes

  • How to Detect Signs of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    How To Detect Diabetes

    Type 1 Diabetes

    Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and roughly 5% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. In type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy.  Learning to detect the symptoms of type 1 diabetes, combined with insulin therapy and other treatments can decrease the risk of developing serious complications of diabetes, including heart and blood vessel disease, nerve damage, kidney damage, eye damage, foot damage, skin and mouth conditions and more. Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can come on quickly and may include:

    • Increased thirst. Common symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include frequent urination, and often feeling very thirsty. Excess sugar that builds up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues, causing you to drink and urinate more than usual.
    • Bedwetting for children who previously didn’t wet their bed at nigh
    • Extreme hunger. Lacking enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your organs and muscles are depleted of energy making you feel very hungry, even though you are eating. (http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/basics/sympto…
    • Unintended weight loss. Even though you may be eating more due to increased hunger, you may lose weight. Lacking the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses fuels stored in fat and muscle.
    • Irritability and mood changes.
    • Abdominal pain, as well as nausea and vomiting.
    • Blurred vision.
    • Serious diaper rash that does not respond to treatment
    • Fruity breath and rapid breath.
    • Frequent yeast infections in girls.
    • Early warning signs include extreme fatigue, even if no strenuous activities have been performed as your cells are deprived of sugar.

     

    Type 2 Diabetes

    Type 2 diabetes, also known as adult-onset and noninsulin dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition caused by high levels of glucose in the blood. Symptoms of Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly and are sometimes so mild they can be difficult to detect.

    Learning how to detect signs of Type 2 diabetes and by taking doctor prescribed preventative measures can help decrease the risk of developing serious complications of diabetes, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations.

    • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your organs and muscles are depleted of energy, which can make you feel very hungry despite eating.
    • Increased thirst. Excess sugar that builds up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues, causing you to drink and urinate more than usual.
    • Weight loss. Though you may be eating more due to increased hunger, you may lose weight. Lacking the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses fuels stored in fat and muscle.
    • Early warning signs include extreme fatigue, even if no strenuous activities have been performed as your cells are deprived of sugar.
    • Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal, as Type 2 diabetes affects your ability to heal and resist infection. The person might also experience dry, itchy skin.
    •  Signs might also include the feeling of pins and needles, tingling, pain or numbness in your feet and/or hands, and in some cases, losing feeling entirely.
    • Areas of darkened skin. Individuals with type 2 diabetes sometimes get patches of dark, velvety skin in the creases and folds of their body, including the neck and armpits. Known as acanthosis nigricans, this condition could be sign of insulin resistance.
    • Talk to your doctor about the various tests that measure your average blood glucose levels and can help detect diabetes, including the A1C, Fasting Plasma Glucose, the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, and the Random Plasma Glucose Test.

     

    Sources:

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20019573

    http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/exercise-and-type-1-diabetes.html

    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P01977

    http://www.urmc.rochester.edu/Encyclopedia/Content.aspx?ContentTypeID=90&ContentID=P01977

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/symptoms/

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diagnosis/?loc=symptoms

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/symptoms/

    http://www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/recognizing-symptoms#CommonSymptoms2

    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/basics/symptoms/con-20031902

  • How to Curb Carb Cravings

    How to Curb Carb Cravings How to Curb Carb Cravings

    When we’re on the go and looking for a quick and sweet pick-me-up, grabbing a pastry or other carb-heavy treat can be very tempting. But for those of us familiar with the sudden post-carb energy crash or looking to better manage our weight because of health concerns like diabetes, we know that finding a way to curb those carb cravings is the key to feeling better and healthier. But for anyone who has tried to ditch carbs and sugars cold turkey, knows that the task can be a difficult one, as those cravings quickly return with a vengeance. Thankfully there are plenty of practical (i.e. not extreme) ways of curbing those cravings. Try these tips to avoid feeling deprived or cranky. Continue reading

  • Delicious and Easy Diabetic Recipes

    Eating healthy with diabetes doesn’t mean your food has to be tasteless. There are plenty of ways to enjoy flavorful feasts that still fit into your diet and don’t take long to prepare. So, whether you or someone you love has diabetes, we here at N-Style ID have rounded up some of our favorite delicious and easy diabetic recipes. These recipes are low in sugar and carbs and perfect for you to try out at home tonight.

    Shrimp Marinated in Lime Juice and Dijon Mustard

    Shrimp Marinated in Lime Juice and Dijon Mustard Shrimp Marinated in Lime Juice and Dijon Mustard

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  • The Rise of Medical Jewelry

    What happens when the worlds of fashion and medical needs meet? Medical jewelry has been around for many years, but it has taken a new turn of awareness for many people who are suffering from different diseases and conditions. Those with medical badges have been reluctant to wear them due to their bulky sizes and appearance. Because of this, there has been a big shift in the appearance of the medical jewelry in the last few years and more options continue to come out as well. There are now many different pieces available in necklaces, bracelets and charms.

    These pieces look like fashionable pieces of jewelry, but also have a medical symbol on the outward side and any specifics on the opposite side. When someone feels like the piece of jewelry is not an eye sore, they are more likely to wear it; so more and more people are satisfied with putting this very important piece of jewelry on every single day.

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  • How Can Medical Jewelry Save Lives?

    With so many medical advances, people are more fully aware of the problems that they have and how to prevent them. For instance, drugs and medications have come a long way in just the last ten years. However, not everyone can handle the drugs the same way, and people may have allergies to commonly used drugs. People also have diagnoses about disorders they have as well that are not always familiar to the general public. No matter what the medical condition is, it is important to have a way to tell emergency responders if you are rendered unconscious or unable to communicate.

    Medical jewelry is the very best solution for all of these problems. These come in all kinds of designs and with custom inscriptions engraved onto them so that you can list exactly what is wrong. Many even allow more than one problem to be listed so that you can just use one piece of jewelry. Wearing these can be very important and save a life. If you are wondering how important these really can be, here are some examples of what would require the use of a piece of medical jewelry.

    Common Conditions
    Epilepsy: Seizures can hit at any time, and communicating with someone during one is next to impossible. Having some sort of trinket on the person that says they have epilepsy can be extremely helpful to anyone who is trying to help. Many times people are on medications already and doctors or anyone treating the person needs to know what medication that is so they know how to best treat them and how best to not treat them. Depending on the state, people with epilepsy can drive under certain requirements. If an accident occurs from a seizure, this can really help out emergency responders.
    Epilepsy Symbol
    Allergies: Food allergies are becoming increasingly common with an estimated 15 million Americans living with them. It is also estimated that 1 in every 13 children has these allergies as well. More allergies include insects, medications, and even latex. Children can rarely tell people about their allergies when they are young. Wearing a piece of jewelry for everyone to see can help save their life because people will know that they cannot eat certain items when you are not around. Some places you may not be are school, with a babysitter, or even at a birthday party. Not only can they serve as a reminder, but it can alert medical personnel that an allergy attack may be occurring if something is wrong. One woman only had her kids wear them when they were away from her, but after a minor car accident she was filling the emergency responders in on her kids’ allergies. The worker inquired about medical bracelets or jewelry of some type and said if she had been unconscious, they would have no idea. Have children always wear their jewelry to help them stay safe.
    Peanut Allergy
    Diabetes: Approximately 25.8 million of the adults and children living in the United States have diabetes. When blood sugar gets too low, the person can become unresponsive, have a seizure, or even go into a coma in extreme cases. These all render the person unable to explain what is happening to them, even if they knew before suffering from the symptoms. If blood sugar gets too high the person can have blurry vision, become confused, or even feel extremely tired or weak. Treatment for either of these scenarios requires quick attention and some action, but these symptoms alone are not obviously diabetes to most people. Having a way to communicate can help before something more severe happens.
    Diabetes Medical Tag Symbol
    Ways to Help

    In order to have a positive experience with this type of medical jewelry, there are a few suggestions most people have. Find some jewelry that is stylish to the person who will be wearing it. If the person thinks it is ugly, makes them feel different, or just plain old do not like it, they are not going to wear it. This is especially true or children and teens. Getting more than one is also a good idea so they have something to pick that they like or matches their outfit each day.

    Another common suggestion is to just make putting it on part of the morning routine. Most parents or individuals have a set routine of things they check for each day. Do they have their lunch? The car keys? Backpacks or purse? Work to make sure that putting on a piece of medical jewelry becomes natural and just part of getting ready each day. This will ensure more success in wearing it all the time so it is there when you need it.

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