You have no items in your shopping cart.

Monthly Archives: November 2012

  • How to Help Someone Having a Seizure

    At N-Style ID, many of the medical ID and medical alert jewelry we make is created for men, women and children with Epilepsy or other seizure disorders. As November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month, we thought we’d wrap-up November with an overview of what you should know and how to react if a loved one or a stranger has a seizure in your presence.

    Many of us have never had to provide help and assistance for someone having a seizure. Because of this there are a few misconceptions about providing the correct care for seizures. Aside from some basic steps to follow, most of the time, a person having a seizure requires no assistance other than a caring and calming presence. If you have never seen someone having a seizure, it can be a somewhat scary experience. Just remember to stay calm at all times. Seizures will end within a couple of minutes. Seizures can be very confusing to those experiencing them and your reassuring presence is extremely comforting while the person is in “recovery mode” immediately following a seizure.

    Now that you know the importance of staying calm and focused in the presence of someone having a seizure, he’s a list of the top do’s and dont’s for providing care in the event of a seizure:

    WHAT TO DO:

    • Stay calm!
    • Look for medical alert jewelry to confirm that the person has a Epilepsy or a seizure disorder
    • Create the safest surrounding environment possible for the person seizing
    • Remove sharp objects from around the person to prevent injury
    • If possible, try to cushion their head with your hands, a pillow or any soft object to help prevent head injuries
    • Try to loosen clothing around their neck
    • Try to pay attention to the length of the seizure
    • When the seizure is over, be sure to slowly move the person onto their left side. This is VERY important to help open their airway as any swelling of the tongue from the seizure or post-seizure vomiting could obstruct their breathing
    • Recovery from the seizure will take a few minutes, but confusion and fatigue is sure to follow. Remain with that person until they are sufficiently recovered

    WHAT NOT TO DO:

    • Do not attempt to restrain the person’s body while convulsing. – This can cause injury to both yourself and the person suffering the seizure
    • Do not put anything in the person’s mouth – This is a major misconception that stems from the concern that a person with a seizure might swallow their tongue. They will not swallow their tongue
    • Do not give the person water, food or pills until they are completely recovered
    • Do not leave someone alone following the seizure until they have fully regained their bearings

    Cal 911 if you are a loved one and the seizure lasts more that five minutes or if you are a stranger and helping someone who is without family or friends.

    For those suffering from Epilepsy or a seizure disorder, always carry medical identification in the form of medical alert jewelry and medical ID card. In the event of an emergency, this will enable the people around you, especially strangers, to provide the appropriate treatment and maintain your safety in the event of a seizure.

    For more information about Epilepsy and seizure disorders, go to:

    http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org

    http://www.epilepsy.com

  • Wearing Medical Alert Jewelry is Critical for Proper Medical Care in An Emergency

    Photo of a Medical Alert Id Jewelry and Bracelet

    Medical alert jewelry is a simple and effective way to get you immediate and proper medical care and to save your life in the event of an emergency.

    If you were in an emergency, first responders need to know if there is a serious or chronic medical condition involved that requires special medical attention.

    Medical alert and medical ID jewelry will alert first responders and bystanders to your medical condition thereby enabling the appropriate care. All medical personnel are trained to look for medical ID jewelry. In a serious medical situation, time is of the essence and can be the difference between life and death.

    There are many medical conditions that should be immediately known to first responders, such as:

    • - Diabetes
    • - Food Allergies
    • - Implants like pacemakers
    • - Severe Asthma
    • - Epilepsy and seizure disorders
    • - Drug Allergies
    • - Shunts for dialysis patients
    • - Alzheimer’s
    • - Bee Sting Allergies
    • - Coronary heart disease
    • - Renal Failure
    • - Transplant Surgery
    • - People on blood thinners
    • - Mentally disabled
    • - Cancer patients
    • - Person’s having bariatric surgery

    Everyone with a serious medical condition should wear a medical alert bracelet. Medical alert / ID bracelets are designed to be noticed by trained personnel. It’s important to note that both medical alert necklaces and bracelets are considered appropriate ID tools by the medical profession. Emergency personnel are trained to check any jewelry on your person to see if it is medical id jewelry. However, its been documented that EMTs always look for bracelets first.

    Additionally, depending on the type of activity you are engaged in, you may consider a different choice of medical alert and medical ID jewelry. For example, if you normally wear an ID necklace and you’re heading to the mountains to go skiing, it’s advisable to switch to an ID bracelet, as first responders would not have to dig through so many upper-body clothing layers to find your ID necklace.

    The information contained on your medical alert jewelry is just as important as actually wearing your alert jewelry on a regular basis.

    Here’s an example of the type of core information that must be included on your medical ID jewelry:

    • - The Star of Life symbol
    • - Statement of your type of medical (and if you take insulin)
    • - Food or drug allergies
    • - Prescription information
    • - In-case-of-emergency (written as ICE) contact number information
    • - Add anything else paramedics must know, including noting any implants (e.g., pacemaker or insulin pumps that shouldn't go in an MRI scanner)

    In recent years, medical ID jewelry has come a long way in terms soft of looks. Gone are the days of the standard stainless steel bracelets.  Fashionable jewelry styles are available for women, men and children that look great and allow for variety, but still convey the vital life-saving information medial alert jewelry was originally designed to do. If you have a medical condition that requires alert jewelry there really is no reason not to be wearing one with so many styles and options available on the market today.

    At N-Style ID we've created hundreds of fun and fashionable medical alert jewelry for men, women and children.

  • American Diabetes Month Kick Off: An Overview of Events and Programs


    Juvenile Diabetes directly affecting our family was the driving force behind starting a company focused on fun, fashion-focused medical alert jewelry for children and adults. At N-Style ID, we take the American Diabetes Month seriously and our grateful for an organization that drives so much awareness to the cause of ending Diabetes in America.

    For November 2012, there are a variety of nationwide events and programs planned to support the cause of Diabetes. You can also check your local diabetes organization to find out about events close to home. To kick-off the month, we’d like to provide an overview of the major events and programs included in the Month’s activities.

    From a national Diabetes Awareness Month program view, the American Diabetes Association will be launching an interactive campaign in partnership with the Awareness month’s title sponsor CVS Pharmacies.  The program theme is “A Day in The Life of Diabetes” and is intended “to demonstrate the increasing impact diabetes has on our families and communities nationwide.” - ADA

    The campaign is centered on social media outlets like Facebook and Twitter. Per the ADA, “The campaign is a call to action for individuals to take a public stand, via our social media channels…. to support the movement to Stop Diabetes®.”

    From October through November, the American Diabetes Association will encourage people to share photographs or imagery on the ADA Facebook or Twitter accounts to illustrate what “A Day in the Life of Diabetes” means to them and how Diabetes impacts their lives.

    The beautiful part of this social media campaign is that all of the imagery posted will be woven into a spectacular “mosaic” representing people across the country living with or affected by diabetes in their lives and casting light on the inter-connectedness of this disease in people’s lives.

    To get people to participate in the program, CVS will be donating $1.00 for every image shared on Facebook or Twitter. To share you experience and learn more about the program go to: https://www.facebook.com/AmericanDiabetesAssociation

    Along with the social media ADA programs, here are some annual events and programs to participate in:

    STEP OUT Walk to Stop Diabetes
    http://stepout.diabetes.org/

    Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes is the signature nationwide fundraising walk of the American Diabetes Association. 20 years strong, this event has raised more than $150,000,000 to Stop Diabetes.

    Be T1D for a Day

    For November 2012, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation will launch a campaign designed to illustrate and raise awareness for what people with Type 1 Diabetes experience on a daily, hourly basis.  The campaign is done via text messaging. Participants will receive text messages hourly throughout the day that “simulate the constant blood sugar testing, insulin injections, and dietary decisions that confront people with T1D.”  Learn more about this program: http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?page_id=117942

    Become a Diabetes Advocate

    American Diabetes Month is a great time to become an advocate for diabetes.
    ADA Advocates are a critical part of the overall American Diabetes Ass goal of increasing funding for research, stopping discrimination in schools and at work, and improved access to health care among other things. Learn more about becoming an advocate at: http://www.diabetes.org/advocate/

    The Safe at School Campaign

    The Safe at School Campaign’s mission is to promote safety and fairness for children with diabetes and is dedicated to “making sure all children with diabetes are medically safe at school and have the same educational opportunities as their classmates.” This campaign relies heavily on the support and donations of others. To learn more about his awesome program and make a November donation, visit: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/parents-and-kids/diabetes-care-at-school/

    Tour De Cure
    The final stop for the 2012 Tour De Cure will take place in Santa Barbara, CA on 11/10/11. The Tour De Cure is a series of diabetes awareness fundraising cycling event with participates riding for themselves, friends or families. Visit the Tour De Cure website for information the Santa Barbara tour and 2013 Tour dates. http://tour.diabetes.org/

    The Risk Test
    November is the time to take The Risk Test for Type 2 Diabetes and learn whether you are at risk for getting Type 2 Diabetes. This is a free test and it could be the most important test of your life. Go to http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/prevention/diabetes-risk-test/

3 Item(s)

Post your comment

N-Style ID